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North Carolina 2014 Results

Participation

A look at the North Carolina SAT results for the class of 2014 shows:

  • 57,997 North Carolina students in the class of 2014 took the SAT, compared to 58,100 last year. Among North Carolina public school students in the class of 2014, 50,691 took the SAT, compared to 50,751 in the previous class.
  • Of those North Carolina students who took the exam, 39.4% (22,830 students) were minority students, compared to 38.3% (22,276 students) from the class of 2013.
  • Among public school test-takers, 41.5% (21,044 students) were minority students, compared to 40.6% (20,600 students) from the class of 2013.
  • 25.3% of students took the exam using a fee waiver, compared to 25.1% from the class of 2013. 27.8% of North Carolina public school students took the exam using a fee waiver, compared to 27.6% from the class of 2013. 

The SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark

The need to improve college and career readiness remains critical. The College Board developed the SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark to help colleges and secondary school administrators, educators, and policymakers identify students who are likely to be ready to take college-entry, credit-bearing courses in college and not need remediation. The SAT Benchmark score of 1550 is associated with a 65% probability of obtaining a first-year college GPA of B- or higher.

  • Overall, 42.6% of SAT takers in the class of 2014 met the SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark. This number has remained virtually unchanged over time. Among all U.S. public school test-takers, 39.1% met the benchmark.
  • In North Carolina, 40.6% of test-takers (23,534 students) met the SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark. Among public school students, 38.5% met the benchmark (19,507 students).
40.6% of North Carolina SAT takers from the class of 2014 met the benchmark
63.8% of North Carolina students from the class of 2014 took the SAT

 

The percentage of SAT takers meeting or exceeding the benchmark tends to decline as SAT participation increases.

The problem is especially acute among underrepresented minority students.

  • 12.0% of North Carolina's African American SAT takers met the benchmark.
  • 27.9% of North Carolina's Hispanic SAT takers met the benchmark.
  • 23.6% of North Carolina's Native American SAT takers met the benchmark.

Studies show that students who meet the benchmark are:

  • More likely to enroll in a four-year college. 78% enrolled in a four-year college or university, compared to only 46% of those who did not meet the benchmark.
  • More likely to complete their degree. 54% earned a bachelor’s degree within four years, compared to only 27% of those who did not meet the benchmark.

Students who met the SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark were more likely to have completed a high school core curriculum, which is defined as four or more years of English, three or more years of mathematics, three or more years of natural science, and three or more years of social science and history. However, about one in four North Carolina students did not take a core curriculum. The same is true of test-takers overall.

Participation and Performance

North Carolina has made a great commitment to expanding access to challenging course work for students across the state. As a result, students have made gains in participation and success.

  • 23.4% of North Carolina’s public high school 11th- and 12th-graders took at least one AP Exam in 2014, up from 16.6% in 2004.
  • 13.7% of North Carolina’s public high school 11th- and 12th-graders scored a 3 or higher on an AP Exam, up from 9.7% in 2004.
  • 9.3% of North Carolina’s public high school 11th- and 12th-grade AP examinees who scored a 3 or higher were from low-income households, compared to 4.0% in 2004.

The Importance of AP for North Carolina Students

New research shows the benefits of AP for all students.Footnote 1 AP students with an average AP Exam score of:

A graphic which shows that AP students with an average AP Exam score: of 1 are 2-6 percentage points higher; of 2 are 7-11 percentage points higher; of 3 are 12-16 percentage points higher; of 4 are 17-22 percentage points higher; and of 5 are 23-27 percentage points higher in expected on-time college graduation rate compared to academically matched peers who don’t take an AP Exam.

 

in expected on-time college graduation rate, compared to academically matched peers who don’t take an AP Exam.

The typical student who receives a score of 3 or higher on two AP Exams has the potential to save, on average, more than $1,300 at a public four-year college in North Carolina and $5,800 at a private institution.Footnote asterisk*

Advancing AP STEM Participation

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, the growth in STEM jobs was three times as fast as growth in non-STEM jobs over the last 10 years. STEM jobs are expected to grow by 17% during the 2008–2018 period versus 9.8% growth for non-STEM jobs.Footnote 2

Research shows that students who took AP mathematics and science were more likely than non-AP students to earn degrees in physical science, engineering, and life science disciplines.Footnote 3

  • 13.0% of North Carolina public high school 11th- and 12th-graders took an AP mathematics or science exam in 2014.
  • 5.8% of underrepresented North Carolina public high school 11th- and 12th-graders took an AP mathematics or science exam in 2014.

AP PotentialTM: A Look Back, A Look Ahead

PSAT/NMSQT results are the best predictor of a student’s potential to succeed in certain AP courses.Footnote 4 From these results, educators can identify students with a 60% or higher likelihood of succeeding in particular AP subjects. Using such data, schools, districts, and states can support access to AP for all academically prepared students.

Data from the class of 2014 found that 40% of prepared public school students in North Carolina graduated without taking a course in an available AP subject for which they had the potential to succeed or attended a school that did not offer a course in the subject.

Based on last year’s PSAT/NMSQT results for 10th grade test-takers in the public school class of 2016, there are at least:

  • 11,600 North Carolina students who have the potential for success in at least one AP course.
  • 5,286 North Carolina students who have the potential for success in at least one STEM subject.
  • 1,392 underrepresented North Carolina students who have the potential for success in at least one AP course.

Notes

The AP data in this report are administration level and represent all of the exams taken within a given year by students in 11th and 12th grades, with the exception of data used to calculate AP Potential data for the classes of 2014 and 2016.

Return to footnote * referrer Please note: These estimates are based on Table 5 of the 2013 College Board report, Trends in College Pricing.

Return to footnote 1 referrer. http://bit.ly/1CmglCj: Results are presented for students with average PSAT/NMSQT performance, and ranges are shown since these rates vary by gender, race/ethnicity, and parent education level.

Return to footnote 2 referrer. http://1.usa.gov/W5OipC

Return to footnote 3 referrer. http://bit.ly/WnOQBn

Return to footnote 4 referrer. Ewing, Camara, and Milsap. (2006). The Relationship Between PSAT/NMSQT Scores and AP Examination Grades: A Follow-Up Study. (http://research.collegeboard.org)

Overview

The PSAT/NMSQT is the linchpin among College Board programs, providing a baseline for analyzing student progress and serving as an early indicator of student potential. It is a valuable tool for educators, students, and parents. It opens doors for improved instruction, identifies students who need to get back on track, expands access to challenging course work, and helps to ensure more successful transitions to college.

North Carolina has committed to expanding access to opportunity for students across the state, and the PSAT/NMSQT plays an important role.

Participation

In North Carolina in 2013, 98,334 students across the state benefited from taking the PSAT/NMSQT. The number of public school students was 84,074.

  • Among North Carolina’s 10th-grade public school students, 35.4% participated in the PSAT/NMSQT last year. This compares to 38.3% of 10th-grade public school students nationally.
  • In North Carolina, 39,134 minority students participated in the 2013 administration. This represents 39.8% of North Carolina test-takers. Overall, 1,678,760 minority students took the test. This represents 45.9% of test-takers.