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Common Diagnostic Tests

To be eligible for testing accommodations on College Board exams, students must document their disability. Results from the latest versions of diagnostic tests are often a requested part of documentation.

Understand the Documentation Guidelines

The guidelines explain the kinds of documentation that are most helpful to the College Board. Learn more about Providing Documentation >

Specific testing requirements depend on the student’s disability and need for accommodations:

  • Students with learning disorders or ADHD may be asked to provide cognitive and academic achievement testing.
  • Students with physical or medical disorders may be asked to provide documentation from a recent medical evaluation.

Use the Current Version

When diagnostic testing results are part of required documentation, the latest versions should be used.

Following are some examples of tests commonly used to diagnose some disabilities and the need for accommodations. There is also a list of brief tests and screening measures that should be used as supplemental documentation only because the College Board does not consider them sufficient on their own. The lists are not exhaustive.

Cognitive Ability Tests

Results from these cognitive ability tests are acceptable (the edition current at time of testing should be used):

  • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children
  • Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities
  • Stanford Binet Intelligence Scales (when individually administered)
  • Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children
  • Differential Ability Scales
  • Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales

Academic Achievement Tests

When a student requests extended time, documentation should include a test that measures the student's academic skills in a timed setting, listed below. See Extended Time Accommodation: Documentation for more detailed requirements.

When requesting a computer accommodation, academic tests of writing, listed below, are often required. See Computer Accommodation: Documentation for more details.

Reading

Results from these reading achievement tests are acceptable (the edition current at time of testing should be used):

  • Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement (general and extended batteries that include fluency measures)
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, with reading rate measure
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement
  • Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests (when individually administered)

Mathematics

Results from these math achievement tests are acceptable (the edition current at time of testing should be used):

  • Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement (general and extended batteries including fluency measures)
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement

Written Language

Results from these written language achievement tests are acceptable (the edition current at time of testing should be used):

  • Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement (general and extended batteries including fluency measures)
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test
  • Test of Written Language
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement

Symptom Validity Tests and Assessment

In keeping with best clinical practices, documentation should reflect a multi-method evaluation. In most cases, this should include an assessment of symptom validity, such as a discussion and interpretation of the consistency and inconsistency of symptoms and performance; results from specific, well-validated symptom validity tests; and/or discussion of forced-choice tests. A discussion of performance could include, for example, an explanation of inconsistent data on different neurocognitive and psychological tests, performance patterns, observed behaviors, and embedded validity indicators.

Evaluations should report the results of performances from the most current edition of acceptable symptom validity tests.

Timed Tests

Results from these achievement tests are acceptable as measures of skills in a timed setting and should be used to document the need for extended time. They are not sufficient documentation when used alone and should be supplemental to other achievement tests. The edition current at time of testing should be used:

  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test
  • Nelson-Denny Reading Test
  • Test of Written Language
  • Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests
  • Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults

Brief Tests and Screening Measures

The following tests are screening tools and, without other measures, do not meet the psychometric criteria to diagnose a disability or establish the need for testing accommodations. The list is not exhaustive.

Cognitive

  • Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence
  • Reynolds Intellectual Screening Test
  • Slosson Intelligence Test Revised
  • Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test
  • Woodcock-Johnson Brief Intellectual Ability

Academic

  • Wide Range Achievement Test 4
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement — Brief Form

 

Related Topics

Documenting Learning Disorders

Get detailed College Board guidelines on documenting learning disorders.

Learning Disorders

Documenting ADHD

Get detailed College Board guidelines on documenting ADHD.

ADHD