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Providing Documentation

To be eligible for accommodations on College Board exams, a student should have documentation showing evidence of the following:

  • The disability
  • The degree to which the student’s activities are affected (functional limitation)
  • The need for the specific accommodations requested

Most Families Work with Their School

Students and Parents: Requesting accommodations through your school is the best way to get College Board approval for testing with accommodations. Find out why requesting accommodations through your school is the best way to get College Board approval for testing with accommodations. >

College Board Documentation Guidelines

When the College Board requests that documentation be submitted for our review, it’s most helpful if it meets our documentation guidelines:

Documentation Tips

  • Do provide detailed documentation supporting the student’s need for the specific accommodation requested, not only the student’s diagnosed disability.
  • Don’t rely on doctor’s notes or IEPs. These are not sufficient to substantiate a request for accommodations. Conclusive statements without supporting information are not helpful.
  • Do provide test scores, including subtest scores, where applicable.

 

College Board Documentation Review

Documentation must always be submitted for College Board review when a family completes a paper request form instead of working with the student’s school.

At times, SSD Coordinators using SSD Online are also asked to submit documentation to the College Board. They will be told what’s required when they create an online request. If documentation review is necessary, processing will not begin until complete documentation has been received.

Documentation review is generally required in these situations:

  • The student does not have a formal plan, such as an IEP or 504 Plan.
  • The accommodations that are requested are not on the student’s formal plan and/or are not being used by the student for classroom tests.
  • The student is requesting more than 100 percent extended time or other uncommon accommodations.
  • The student is requesting certain accommodations, such as 100 percent extended time or accommodations that require a one-to-one setting, and does not have current documentation on file at the school. 
  • The student does not have a diagnosed disability.

Related Topics

Who Is Eligible?

Learn how eligibility for accommodations on College Board exams is determined.

Find Out Who’s Eligible

Disability Documentation Guidelines

Be sure to review the documentation guidelines for the student’s particular disability.

Disability Documentation Guidelines